Super Bowl Monday Lagniappe

Marie "Red" Mahoney Texas Baseball Hall of Fame

Marie “Red” Mahoney
Texas Baseball Hall of Fame

Marie “Red” Mahoney, Rest in Peace. A “Celebration of Life” memorial service for the late Marie “Red” Mahoney of the Texas Baseball Hall of Fame was held on Saturday February 6th at the Heights Funeral Home, 1317 Heights Boulevard in Houston. A visitation for friends and family was planned from 2:00 to 3:00 PM followed by the Memorial Service at 3:00 PM. We were unable to attend due to a longstanding family commitment Saturday, but Red remained close to our hearts and positive thoughts at service time, as she is every night in prayer. Houston’s shining star from the women’s “league of their own” era will glow forever for as long as we have baseball historians, local and national, on the job and eager to keep the record clear about her pioneer contributions.

“Goodbye, Red, but know this too: You are always in our hearts, even though you’re far away.”

imagecomposer.nfl.com

Super Bowl Monday. Several media types yesterday suggested that the Monday following each Super Bowl should be declared a national holiday. The reasons are multiple: (1) Even the non-drinking fans are hungover from the food they ate and the energy they spent on the Super Bowl game the previous day. (2) a A national holiday would also spare the fans from the guilt of going to work on Monday without the energies needed to earn their pay (Wink. Wink.) Maybe so. But how about moving the Super Bowl to a Saturday date. – Then the day-after would be Sunday – a day that was intended for rest and travel home from distant places. Besides, in this era of penalties for the absence of parity in any form, “Super Bowl Monday” for football fans would cry out for something similar for the fans of other big sports when Game Seven of the MLB World Series or the NBA Championship Finals was set to be played on any date preceding a normal work day.

The Denver Texans. Congratulations to the Denver Broncos and all of their former coaches and players from the Houston Texans. The Denver Broncos defeated the Carolina Panthers, 24-10, yesterday, in a game that owes most of the credit to the shrewd defense of former Texan and now Bronco coordinator Wade Phillips and to the field leadership of the game’s MVP, Bronco linebacker Von Miller. Congratulations also to Denver Head Coach Gary Kubiak. With his team’s victory, the former Texans Head Coach won a Super Bowl in hist first year at the helm, becoming also the first Super Bowl Head Coach in history to win a ring for a team in which had once played. The great Peyton Manning also deserves credit for keeping the offense out of deadly trouble in a game dominated by defenses. Manning did have an interception, but it did not lead to any Panther points. The Denver win earned Manning his second Super Bowl win and the 200th win of his playing career as a quarterback.

The Super Bowl Score. Our published pre-game guess yesterday was Denver by 27-17. Denver won by 24-10. Do the math. Had Denver kicked one more field goal, and had Carolina scored one more touchdown with a single PAT, we would have had it on the nose. That’s close enough for a self-congratulatory pat on the back for luckily guessing that the No. 1 defense in the NFL would hold down the production of the best scoring club in the league. – Don’t you think?

Nationwide Is On Your Side. That little seven syllable Nationwide jingle that Peyton Manning plays with on the commercials with new parody words got into my head at one point. He almost lost control of a ball on a hand-off up the middle, but recovered it in time.

That play left my brain with a thought that found its way into a whispered singing version of: “Al-most-lost-the-G-D-ball!”

Astros-Emojis 01

Astrodome History News. Good friend and fellow SABR compadre Sam Quintero passed on a few facts to me this morning that simply whets my appetite for reading more by acquiring my own copy of James Gast’sThe Astrodome: Building an American Spectacle”: (1) John Wordman, an employee of Monsanto, is credited with giving the new ersatz grass the name “Astroturf”. (2) When the Astros came to Monsanto, the material that would be given the name “Astroturf” already existed and was in place on an experimental basis at some small college back east. (3) When Monsanto offered to fix the increased acceleration of balls hit sharply off the new turf, Judge Roy Hofheinz apparently told Monsanto to leave the fast rug hop alone. He wanted it to just as it was – faster and harder to play – we suppose. – The Gast book is available through Amazon at $13.42 for paperback and $9.99 for the Kindle version.

The Judge Did It! After I published the information from James Gast’s book about some fellow named John Wordman being the originator of the term “AstroTurf,” I received this corrective comment from the one fellow in the world who should know best about these matters of proper credit, Mr. Tal Smith.

Tal reports what we have long thought was true about the origins of the name. I have taken the liberty of moving the entire body of his comment and repeating it here – with a bold type embellishment of the name credit correction:

“For the record, I was directly involved in the initial examination (which was conducted at the Moses Brown private school in Providence, RI) and subsequent testing of the artificial turf developed by Monsanto’s Chemstrand subsidiary. It was Judge Roy Hofheinz who coined the term “Astroturf” to describe and promote the revolutionary playing surface. Monsanto and Chemstrand had previously called their product “Chemgrass.” Prior to its installation in the Astrodome the turf had been experimental with no commercial application.”

~ Tal Smith, former President of the Houston Astros and Club Supervisor of the Astrodome’s Construction and Corrective Measures to the Roof Visual Problems and Resultant Need for an Artificial Playing Surface.”

____________________

Have a nice Monday – even if you do have to work.

eagle-0range

Bill McCurdy

Publisher, Editor, Writer

The Pecan Park Eagle

Houston, Texas

https://bill37mccurdy.com/

 

 

 

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4 Responses to “Super Bowl Monday Lagniappe”

  1. materene Says:

    You nailed it, the super bowl Texans. That is the first thing on my mind after watching a great game by Denver and I thought to myself this is all about good ownership and good coaching. They were hitting on all cylinders last night. What a great way for Manning to retire and it would be counter productive if he did not retire. He has the records now even over his boss Elway ! I always love the way things like this turn out so the pregame talking heads can come back to reality and stop making personal picks, they ruin good games in every sport always changing something when things don’t go their way. You can tell in their voices who they are rooting for and broadcasters and booth people should not be in the business of cheer leading. ;0) Rest in peace for the Lady above, the Heights is my old home and my church Baptist Temple isn’t far down the street from the funeral home. The area is now like a foreign country to me.

  2. Tom Hunter Says:

    The lion’s share of the credit for our Denver Broncos win in the Super Bowl should go to defensive co-ordinator, Wade Phillips, who was also named NFL Assistant Coach of the Year.

  3. Tal Smith Says:

    For the record, I was directly involved in the initial examination (which was conducted at the Moses Brown private school in Providence, RI) and subsequent testing of the artificial turf developed by Monsanto’s Chemstrand subsidiary. It was Judge Roy Hofheinz who coined the term “Astroturf” to describe and promote the revolutionary playing surface. Monsanto and Chemstrand had previously called their product “Chemgrass.” Prior to its installation in the Astrodome the turf had been experimental with no commercial application.

  4. jagast Says:

    Thank you very much for mentioning my book about the Astrodome. I would like to set the record straight on one small point: my book does not make any mention of a John Wordman, and I don’t know who he is.

    That said, you might be interested to know that I sorted through various versions of the naming story while researching my book. In “The Grand Huckster,” Hofheinz’s biographer Edgar Ray reported that Monsanto shrewdly beat Hofheinz to the punch by trademarking the name “AstroTurf,” much to the Judge’s displeasure. This was a tantalizing story, as it would represent a very rare instance of Hofheinz being outfoxed. However, I subsequently interviewed Tal Smith and two of the Judge’s children, and each of them told me that naming rights were agreed on by all and made part of the deal, and that’s what is reported in the book.

    Regards,
    James Gast

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