1928: UT Solves Student Alcohol Abuse Problem

HE: "Are you going back to Corpus after you graduate from UT?" SHE: Don't know. Daddy's oil-richer than Midas. I may just go live in Paris for a while."

HE: “Are you going back to Corpus after you graduate from UT?”
SHE: “Daddy’s oil-richer than Midas. I may just go live in Paris.”

Liquor Cause for Removal From Dances

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“Any person under the influence of intoxicating liquor to any degree will be put off the dance floor and his name will be turned in to the Dean of Student Life,” was the decision of the (UT) Students’ Assembly yesterday in regard to German Club Dances. This decision also applies to first offenses, according to Potty McCullough, dance manager.

(The ruling also stated) That anyone who is not a student in good standing in the University will be removed from the floor was also decided by the Assembly.

~ Austin Daily Texan, March 10, 1928, Page 1.

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The UT Students’ Assembly may have thought they had solved the alcohol abuse problem on campus – and, at least, they may have turned down the “Roaring” part of  the “Roaring Twenties” buzz at German Club dances, but their failure to do so may have been helped along by their Zeitgeist view of alcohol abuse and public drunkenness as an exclusively male problem. Our clue to that possible conclusion is even telegraphed for us readers from the future by the Daily Texan’s choice of wording in the first sentence of the above report: “Any person under the influence of intoxicating liquor to any degree will be put off the dance floor and his name will be turned in to the Dean of Student Life.”

Unless my own memory of those glorious youthful times is now blurred, I seem to remember the early life collegiate drinking I may have enjoyed as having everything to do with either the female company I pursued – or the female company I found. Fortunately for me, I was also exposed to the learning opportunity in my own early life experiences with wine, women, and song that alcohol was not the adhesive one needs to build or maintain a relationship that is worth keeping over time. To put it mildly, I got to learn that the heart of everything – real love and the passionate pursuit of life’s sweet spot for creative engagement with the stuff that matters – has nothing to do with alcohol.

Congratulations, anyway, to the 1928 UT Student Assembly for reminding us that alcohol consumption at public social functions probably was the real “Apple of Eden”  – as far as our earliest consumable temptations are concerned. The 1928 UT Student Assembly simply “forgot” that women like alcohol too.

 

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3 Responses to “1928: UT Solves Student Alcohol Abuse Problem”

  1. Cliff Blau Says:

    They were using “his” to refer to both male and female students, which is proper grammar.

    • Bill McCurdy Says:

      You missed my point this time, Cliff. Of course, the use of “his” for both sexes was both grammatically correct and socially expected in the 1920s, and for some time, thereafter, but all that began to change during the 1970s. Today we hardly ever, if at all, see the use of all male words and pronouns used as the acceptable generic, all-inclusive forms in most official writing. We see “chairperson” or, more simply “chair”, or even “chairwoman”, if the group leader is known to be female.

      I’m sorry for the “tongue in cheek” seriousness you may have read into my play on the 1928 use of “his name” in today’s column if it slipped by you this time at a level of invisibility. 🙂

      As a reminder of the change from TV marketing, are you aware of this one? In the past ten years, Ace Hardware has changed their company slogan from “Ace is the place for the helpful hardware man” – to “…helpful hardware person.”

      Pretty inspirational, right?

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