Posts Tagged ‘April 10th in Bseball History’

April 10th: A Taste of Baseball History

April 10, 2014
 "Don't worry. - Be happy." Baseball Commissioner Happy Chandler 1945-1951


“Don’t worry. – Be happy.”
Baseball Commissioner
Happy Chandler
1945-1951

April 10, 1947: United Press, Cincinnati: Commissioner A.X. (Happy) Chandler, in the most sweeping punitive action since the Black Sox Scandal of 1919, today suspended (Brooklyn) manager Leo Durocher for a year, banned New York (Yankees) coach Charley Dressen for thirty days, and fined each club $2,000 for “conduct detrimental to baseball.”

He also handed out a $4500 fine to Harold Parrott, road secretary of the Brooklyn club for “writing a deliberately derogatory column about others in baseball.”

(There are no rights to freedom of assembly or free speech in baseball.)

~ United Press, Cincinnati, Nevada State Journal, April 10, 1947, Page 14.

"1936 just might be the year the Cubs win their first World Series since 1908!"

“1936 just might be the year the Cubs win their first World Series since 1908!”

April 10, 1936: Chicago is a logical choice to repeat in the National League.

With the confidence that came with the 21 victories that swept them to the grand old rag last fall in the greatest finish in baseball history, the young Cubs should prove much too formidable for none too robust opposition.

The Bruins, including te veterans Charley Root, Charley Grimm, and Gabby Hartnett, averaging only 26 years of age. Paced by the fleet Augie Galan and the brilliant Lon Warneke, the Wrigley entry ought to finish there or thereabouts for the next several campaigns.

~ Harry Grayson, Sports Editor, NEA Service, Gastonia Daily Gazette, April 10, 1936, Page 6.

"I earn my dough! - By the way, it''s 1927 - and I'm about to have a much better  year than the President of the United States."

“I earn my dough! – By the way, it”s 1927 – and I’m about to have a much better year than the President of the United States.”

April 10, 1927: Billy Evans Says: Did the New York Yankees make a wise move when Babe Ruth was signed to a three-year contract calling for $70,000 per annum?

There seems to be considerable difference of opinion on the is point.

Babe Ruth requested a one-year contract for one-hundred thousand simoleons. He agreed to take $30,000 less (per year) on a three-year contract.

Babe Ruth is one player who earns every cent he receives for his services, regardless of the size of his contract. Therefore, he is entitled to just as much money as he can get.

~ Billy Evans, Wichita Daily Times, April 10, 1927, Page 11.