MLB’s Nine 4 Million Home Attendance Clubs

TEAM YEAR HOME GATE PER GAME PARK
Colorado Rockies 1993 4,483,350 55,350 Mile High Stadium
New York Yankees 2008 4,298,655 53,070 Yankee Stadium
New York Yankees 2007 4,271,867 52,739 Yankee Stadium
New York Yankees 2006 4,248,067 52,455 Yankee Stadium
New York Yankees 2005 4,090,696 50,502 Yankee Stadium
Toronto Blue Jays 1993 4,057.947 50,098 SkyDome
New York Mets 2008 4,042,045 49,902 Shea Stadium
Toronto Blue Jays 1992 4,028,318 49,732 SkyDome
Toronto Blue Jays 1991 4,001,527 49,402 SkyDome
The Rockies drew over 4,000,000 fans in their 1993 first season. - How did they do it? Did they count live bears that came in from the woods to tour the "new" Rockies?

The Rockies drew over 4,000,000 fans in their 1993 first season. – How did they do it? Did they count live bears that came in from the woods to tour the “new” Rockies?

Data Source Link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_League_Baseball_attendance_records

Notes on the Nine Clubs that have achieved the only 4-million home gate season attendance marks:

The Toronto Blue Jays (3 appearances)

The Toronto Blue Jays became the first MLB club in history to go beyond the 4 million home game attendance mark in 1991, and they continued this boost of fan support for two more years through 1992 and 1993. In 1991, the Jays won the AL East title, but lost the pennant to the Twins in the playoffs. They followed with consecutive World Series title years in 1992 and 1993. Throw in the shiny effect of the new-since-1989 SkyDome and the formula was perfect for record support of the first World Series champion from a non-USA city member of MLB. Putting a cork back on the magic fan juicer was “1994” and the bitter labor-management crisis that both shortened the season and cancelled the World Series.

The Two New York Teams (5 total appearances)

The Yankees (4) and Mets (1) occupied 5 of the 9 spots earned by MLB’s only 4-million season home attendance club. In 2008, both New York clubs made it, grabbing a record 8-millon plus attendance mark for the Big Apple as the only “town” in America that could have pulled off that freakishly strong support for baseball in America.

The Colorado Rockies (1 appearance)

It was the Rockies first year. We get it. “New” usually translates new fan hope into strong attendance until reality creeps in – but – over million of them? – The Pecan Park Eagle would like to invite Tom Hunter – or any other expert on Rockies baseball history  – to explain how this happened for a club in one of baseball’s smaller market cities that finished their 1993 season at 67-95 in 7th place in the NL West Division. Was the “magic” of their first season also helped by the Rockies playing at Mile High Stadium – or is there something more ethereal and dynamic that we need to understand about Colorado fans? –  What ever you share with us by e-mail or public comment will be moved up here as an addendum to the column with credit to you, if you have no objection. And today, that same invitation goes out to any other comments that readers may have on this topic about any of the clubs.

Thank you very much. I’m getting better from a sorry-ankle cold that I picked up this week and would enjoy your digital company in the knowledge that I cannot infect you.

Have a safe and healthy weekend!

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Addendum Comment # 1 Re: The Colorado Rockies (1993)

Cliff Blau Says:  

On the Rockies- It makes me think of what Clark Griffith said about the Nationals- “Fans like home runs, and we have assembled a pitching staff to please our fans.” Lots of scoring and first year of an eagerly anticipated major league team= big attendance.

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Addendum Comment # 2 Re: The Colorado Rockies (1993)

Tom Hunter Says: (May 22, 2016 at 3:05 am by e-mail)

I moved to Denver in the fall of 1973 and attended my first baseball game at Mile High Stadium the next year between the Denver Bears and their major league affiliate, the Houston Astros.  One notable pitcher on the Bears roster was J.R. Richard.  I discovered that many people in Denver were New York Yankees fans because the Bears were a Triple-A farm club of the Yankees from 1955-’58 and featured such players as Tony Kubek, Bobby Richardson, Don Larsen, Ralph Terry, Ryne Duren, Johnny Blanchard, and Norm Siebern as well as manager Ralph Houk.  Billy Martin’s first managing job was with the Denver Bears in 1968, when they were affiliated with Minnesota Twins.

Denver has a rich baseball history and the Bears actually outdrew a few major league teams in attendance.  In 1977, billionaire oilman Marvin Davis unsuccessfully tried to move the Oakland A’s to Denver.  After the 1984 season, the Bears were sold and renamed the Denver Zephyrs. The Zephyrs roster included Barry Larkin, Chris Sabo, Eric Davis, Paul O’Neill, Billy Bates, and Ron Dibble.  They played on the Cincinnati Reds team that swept the Oakland A’s in the 1990 World Series.

Before Denver was awarded a National League franchise in 1991, the closest major league teams were in Missouri or California.  The Colorado Rockies play in Denver, but draw fans from all over the state as well as neighboring states and are truly a regional team.

I went to the third game ever played by the Houston Colt .45s on April 12, 1962 at Colt Stadium and I was in Mile High Stadium (neé Bears Stadium) on April 9, 1993 along with 80,226 other fans for the Colorado Rockies inaugural home opener against the Montréal Expos.  It was a thrill for me, but even more so for native Denverites, who as long-suffering faithful fans had waited decades for this day.

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Addendum Comment # 3 Re: The New York Yankees (2005-2008)

Mark W Says: 

It’s intriguing to me that the first year the Yankees topped 4,000,0000 (love to see the zeroes) was the year after the Red Sox came back on them from an 0-3 deficit in the ALCS, and even more intriguing that they never managed 4,000,000 during their run of four World Series titles in five years, 1996-2000. It’s also intriguing that the Yankees lowest total during their four year 4,000,000 run was the year they last won the World Series, and that was the only time they won the World Series during their four-year 4,000,000 run.

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Addendum Comment # 4 Re: The improbability of another 4-million season home gate

Greg C Lucas Says:

With what ticket prices have done in recent years I doubt if 4-million can ever be reached again. Certainly it won’t happen with the Yankees in their new stadium unless prices go way down. However if prices were ever reduced enough I think 4-million would not be an unreasonable goal if the stars were aligned.

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eagle-0range
Bill McCurdy

Publisher, Editor, Writer

The Pecan Park Eagle

Houston, Texas

https://bill37mccurdy.com/

 

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3 Responses to “MLB’s Nine 4 Million Home Attendance Clubs”

  1. Cliff Blau Says:

    On the Rockies- It makes me think of what Clark Griffith said about the Nationals- “Fans like home runs, and we have assembled a pitching staff to please our fans.” Lots of scoring and first year of an eagerly anticipated major league team= big attendance.

  2. Mark W Says:

    It’s intriguing to me that the first year the Yankees topped 4,000,0000 (love to see the zeroes) was the year after the Red Sox came back on them from an 0-3 deficit in the ALCS, and even more intriguing that they never managed 4,000,000 during their run of four World Series titles in five years, 1996-2000. It’s also intriguing that the Yankees lowest total during their four year 4,000,000 run was the year they last won the World Series, and that was the only time they won the World Series during their four-year 4,000,000 run.

  3. gregclucas Says:

    With what ticket prices have done in recent years I doubt if 4-million can ever be reached again. Certainly it won’t happen with the Yankees in their new stadium unless prices go way down. However if prices were ever reduced enough I think 4-million would not be an unreasonable goal if the stars were aligned.

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