Back-In-The-Day News: May 11, 2015

(1) HAS INFLATION REALLY BEEN THAT BAD?

GALVESTON DAILY NEWS MAY 17, 1921 SUBMITTED BY DARRELL PITTMAN

GALVESTON DAILY NEWS
MAY 17, 1921
SUBMITTED BY DARRELL PITTMAN

In case that type copy from 1921 is too hard to read, it says back in 1921 that the New York Yankees are planning to construct their own baseball park over in the Bronx and that the 75,000 seat stadium will cost $2,000,000 to build. Two Million Dollars??? – For that kind of money today, a fan could buy 20,000 salvage seats from the now vacant and unused Astrodome!

(2) LONGEST NO-HITTER IN HISTORY WENT 17 INNINGS IN 1909

THE SPORTING NEWS BY CONTRIBUTOR TIM HAGERTY JUNE 22, 2014

THE SPORTING NEWS
BY CONTRIBUTOR TIM HAGERTY
JUNE 22, 2014 (from a suggestion by Darrell Pittman)

Chalk this mind-bending achievement up to pitcher Fred Toney of the Class D Winchester (KY) Hustlers. Back on May 10, 1909 he pitched his home club to a 17-inning, 1-0, no-hit shutout of the Lexington (KY) Colts. The game finally ended when Winchester got down a successful squeeze play bunt in the bottom of the 17th to protect Toney from might have been the biggest individual heartbreak in baseball history had the visitors finally cashed in a run on a scrawny hit of their own in the top of the 18th or somewhere even more ridiculously beyond that incredible game mark.

What we still don’t know from this report is – how long did it take in hours and minutes to play this classic game? Based upon the way things have slowed down in received years, our guess is that got to 17 innings in a 1909 Class D ballgame in which neither team had scored to that point in less time than it now takes an MLB club in 2015 to lay nine innings of an everyday multiple runs and hits game.

Here’s a link to the story by Tim Hagerty:

http://www.sportingnews.com/mlb/story/2014-06-22/17-inning-no-hitter-fred-to
ney-winchester-kentucky-hustlers

And here’s how the story was written back in 1909.

Sporting News, Vol. 53 No. 11,  May 22, 1909 Contributed by Darrell Pittman

Sporting News, Vol. 53 No. 11,
May 22, 1909
Contributed by Darrell Pittman

 Have a great week, everybody!

2 Responses to “Back-In-The-Day News: May 11, 2015”

  1. Darrell Pittman Says:

    Time of game: 2:45

  2. Mark W. Says:

    From Wikipedia:

    >>Fred Toney (December 11, 1888 – March 11, 1953) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds, New York Giants and St. Louis Cardinals from 1911-1923. His career record was 139 wins, 102 losses, and a 2.69 earned run average. Toney twice won 20 games in a season (1917, 1920) and also led the National League in saves in 1918.[1]

    Toney is best remembered for his participation in what the record books used to refer to as a double no-hitter.

    On May 2, 1917, at the ballpark now known as Wrigley Field, Toney dueled with Hippo Vaughn of the Chicago Cubs during nine hitless innings. In the top of the tenth, the Reds scored on a couple of hits after Vaughn had retired the first batter, while Toney continued to hold the Cubs hitless in the bottom of the inning, winning the game for the Reds. With changes to the scoring rules in recent years, this game is no longer considered as a no-hitter for Vaughn; but it is still the only occasion in Major League history in which a regulation nine innings was played without either team logging a hit.[2]

    On July 1, 1917, Toney pitched two complete-game, three-hitters for victories in a doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates, to set a record for fewest hits allowed in a double header by a Major League pitcher.[3]

    Toney also holds the record for the longest no-hitter in organized baseball history. On May 10, 1909, while pitching for the Winchester Hustlers of the Blue Grass League, he defeated the Lexington Colts in 17 innings, 1–0, striking out 19 batters and walking only one, before Winchester finally scored a run on a squeeze play in the bottom of the 17th.[4]<<

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