The Tragedy of Addiction: Sammy Stewart

On September 1, 1978, Baltimore Orioles pitcher Sammy Stewart set the MLB rookie mark by striking out 7 batters in a row in one game as a pitcher facing the Chicago White Sox.

Over the past half century, plus some single digit years, time span of my chosen career as a psychotherapist, I have been asked many times: What’s the difference between dangerous compulsions and addictions? The older book answer always was that “compulsion” is the psychological basis for repetitive destructive behavior, whereas, “addiction” is the physiological bond that ties the individual to the craving for particular substances or activities.

Today, with only a little more than five months left on the clock before my complete and final retirement from private practice at the end of the day, Friday, August 31, 2018, I prefer to describe the differences in these terms:

“Compulsion” is anything we do, seek, or avoid because we think we have no choice. Chances are, we do. We simply will not allow ourselves to see the alternatives because we “fear” changing our ways – or we think we will feel “guilty” for the disappointment that our change will cause us – or  others close to us.

“Addiction” is the harder stuff of physical craving. Whatever it is, if we are now addicted to it, we no longer have any choice but to seek its satisfaction at whatever cost to self or others that now rolls from it. The physical addiction must be halted, over hours or days, or however long it takes, by restraint from access to the source that feeds it. Then we have to see if there’s enough person left to work the long hard walk to sober recovery with all the help we can muster.

It isn’t easy – for anybody involved in the treatment process because we are all, patient and treatment team members alike, in a slightly different way, taking up arms against the force behind every Gothic villain you ever read about in literature.

Addiction is the appetite that uses the human body to get what it wants at any cost it requires.

I’m saying all these things today in the hope that you will keep them in mind before you read the following link to the tragic story of Sammy Stewart and his death from addiction. The odds were against him finding religion or recovery on his own. And Sammy Stewart was a guy who had made greater contact with powerful people who may have wanted to help him. Didn’t happen. Usually doesn’t. The cold wild eyes of addiction see a well-intentioned do-gooder coming at them from a mile away.

When he died, Sammy Stewart was far down the road of either spending the rest of his appetite life as the small town family monster, the guy under the bridge, the fellow who went off to the state asylum and never came back, or the man who got sentenced to the penitentiary, where he later got killed by another inmate. As his story turned out, Sammy turned out to be the guy who showed up dead at home. He could as easily have been found dead wherever the appetite had taken him that day or night.

In Sammy’s case, we will just have to console ourselves in the fact that he didn’t take more people with him on the way out.

Addiction. So sad. Now all we have to is bury a fellow who was once the young pitcher from Baltimore that struck out a rookie record seven batters in a row during his first 1978 major league game against the White Sox.

Addiction. It is the cancer of mental illness.

Addiction. Wish we could get some powerful people behind programs that might save a few more Sammy Stewarts than we now do.



Thank you, Rob Sangster, for bringing the death of Sammy Stewart to my attention.


Bill McCurdy

Principal Writer, Editor, Publisher

The Pecan Park Eagle


One Response to “The Tragedy of Addiction: Sammy Stewart”

  1. Rick B. Says:

    Reminds me of the unfortunate death of another drug-addicted pitcher – one whom I saw pitch at old Three Rivers Stadium – Rod Scurry of the Pirates.

    Here is a link to his obituary that describes the state in which he was found immediately preceding his death:

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